Mentions and Recognition

Featured in the top QA list by TestSigma on Linkedin & Twitter

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6654394104824328192/

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My articles featured by the Testing Curator in Weekly Testing Bits

My experience speaking at TestBash Homehttp://blog.testingcurator.com/2020/05/10/testing-bits-testing-bits-mary-3rd-may-9th-2020/
Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-4http://blog.testingcurator.com/2020/04/19/testing-bits-april-12th-april-18th-2020/
Understanding Burnout Symptoms in Tech Workershttp://blog.testingcurator.com/2020/02/16/testing-bits-february-9th-february-15th-2020/

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Articles featured by Five_blogs

My Article Featured in Top reads at-
Four Goals of Testing Beyond Finding Defectshttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/05/18/five-blogs-18-may-2020/
Four Ideas for Self-Care When Working from Homehttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/04/24/five-blogs-24-april-2020/
Four Things That Can Sabotage a Sprinthttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/04/14/five-blogs-14-april-2020/
Do You Have Blind Spots in Your Software Testing?https://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/03/20/five-blogs-20-march-2020/
Become a Self-Taught Software Tester in 2020https://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/five-blogs-24-february-2020/
Four Natural Personality Traits That Make a Great Testerhttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/02/07/five-blogs-7-february-2020/
The Partnership of Testing and Checkinghttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/01/23/five-blogs-23-january-2020/
Three New Year’s Resolutions Every Tester Should Makehttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2020/01/03/five-blogs-3-january-2020/
Three Uncommon Metrics Your Agile Team Should Be Tracking
and
Three Metrics Your Agile Team Should Stop Using
https://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/12/09/five-blogs-9-december-2019/
Defining Exit Criteria for All Stages of Your Agile Projecthttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/11/12/five-blogs-12-november-2019/
Overcoming Barriers to Effective Communications in Agile Teamshttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/10/22/five-blogs-22-october-2019/
Three Ways Agile Testers Can Use Walkthroughshttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/10/16/five-blogs-16-october-2019/
Three Things to Learn from the Bugs You Foundhttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/09/11/five-blogs-11-september-2019/
Scrum, Kanban, and ScrumBan: What’s the Difference?https://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/08/13/five-blogs-13-augustus-2019/
Four Ways Task Boards Help an Agile Teamhttps://5blogs.wordpress.com/2019/07/26/five-blogs-26-july-2019/

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Other mentions and features of my articles

http://blog.practicingitpm.com/2020/02/16/new-pm-articles-for-the-week-of-february-10-16/

A Mention by The Pirate Tester!

https://thepiratetester.wordpress.com/2019/06/18/2019-06-18-should-istqb-exist/

Being Featured in the top 75 Software Testing Blogs

https://testwithnishi.com/2018/05/11/this-website-is-now-featured-in-the-75-best-software-testing-blogs/

I am speaking at TestBash Home 2020

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade! None better example of this than the zingy, sweet lemonade under preparation by this awesome community at @Ministry Of Testing , bringing the ‘testing’ flavors of the entire world right to your home!

Despite cancellations of a number of events due to the ongoing pandemic, this community has come back together to create an amazing online event. I am super excited to be speaking at TestBash Home 2020 – the first online software testing conference by Ministry Of Testing. It will begin on the 30th of April 2020 and run for a full 24 hours into the 1st of May 2020, traveling all timezones so that everyone in our truly global testing community can get involved. 

I am honored to be a part of such an awesome line-up of speakers. These hours are going to be packed full of interactive sessions including talks, panels, challenges, plus we’ll relive and reflect on some classic TestBash talks.

Speakers List – TestBash Home 2020

The agenda is live now-

Checkout more details about the event and schedule here –https://www.ministryoftesting.com/events/testbash-home-2020

Follow the updates on Twitter—

Register now for loads of fun and learning and engaging with a worldwide community of testers right from your home!

Cheers

Nishi

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-4

“Team Logistics”

  • Testers on agile teams feel very strongly about their role as customer advocate and also feel they can influence the rest of the team with their quality thinking.
  • Testers also need training on pair testing, working with incomplete and changing requirements, automation and all of the other new skills that are required.
  • Programmers also might need coaching to understand the importance of business-facing tests and the whole-team approach to writing and automating tests.
  • The pairing of programmers and testers can only improve communication about the quality of the product.

“One major advantage of an integrated project team is that there’s only one budget and one schedule.”

The difference between a traditional cross-functional team and an agile team is the approach to the whole-team effort. Members are not just “representing” their functions in the team but are becoming true members of the team for as long as the project or permanent team exists.

  • The best teams are those that have learned to work together and have developed trust with one another.
  • Teams work better when they have ready access to all team members, easy visibility of all progress charts and an environment that fosters communication.
  • Teams make the best progress when they’re empowered to identify and solve their own problems. If you’re a manager, resist the temptation to impose all your good ideas on the team.
  • Make sure testers are involved in all meetings! If you are a tester and someone forgets to invite you to a meeting, invite yourself!

“Courage is especially important. Get up and go talk to people; ask how you can help. Reach out to team members and other teams for direct communication. Notice impediments ad ask the team to help remove them.”

Agile development works because it gets obstacles out of our path and lets us do our best work.

——- On to the next one!

Cheers

Nishi

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-3

“Cultural Challenges”

This chapter is dedicated to talking about organisational problems with agile adoption, mostly from a cultural point of view- how people perceive changes, how they work, giving up control and also taking charge. It is a very comprehensive description of many problems we see on a daily basis at our work and in teams struggling with agile transformation.

Points to remember and Quotable Quotes

  • Agile teams are best suites for organisations that allow independent thinking.
  • Fear is a powerful emotion, and if not addressed, it can jeopardize the transition into agile
  • Testers who don’t change their approach to testing have a hard time working closely with the rest of the development team
  • If the organisation culture is to push towards release without caring for quality, the teams will face an uphill battle in working in agile
  • Companies where testers assume the role of ‘Quality Police’ will also have a challenge since teams will not buy-into the idea of building quality in, as they are accustomed to badgering it in later.
  • If your organisation focuses on learning, it will encourage continuous process improvement and will likely adopt agile much more quickly.
  • Testers need time and training, like everyone else learning to work in agile
  • To help testers adjust, you may need to bring in an experienced agile testing coach to act as a mentor and a teacher.

Agile focuses on working at a sustainable pace, all the time. In contrast to the ‘fast and furious’ testing done at the end of release cycles in traditional projects (often amounting to overtime). In agile, if overtime is required, it is an exception, and that too for the whole team and not just the testers.

  • In agile, the relationship between the customer and the development team is more a partnership than a vendor-supplier relationship.
  • Even if an entire company adopts agile, some teams make the transition more successfully than others.

About Introducing Change-

“Expect and Accept Chaos as you implement Agile Processes.”

Find the areas of most pain, determine what practices will solve the problem so that you can get some immediate progress out of the chaos.

  • The critical success factor is whether the team takes ownership and has the ability to customise its approach
  • Celebrate success- Acknowledgement is important if you want a change to stick.
  • Rather than managing the team’s activities at a low level, managers of agile teams focus on removing obstacles so that team members can do their best work

“Agile development might seem fast-paced, but the change can seem glacial”

Beware of the Quality Police mentality— Be a collaborator, not an enforcer

The highlight of this chapter for me was reading the ‘Testers Bill of Rights’

I had not heard about this before , so reading this was pretty cool, and for sure fundamental to any tester’s life. Check it out-

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-2

“The Principles for agile testers”

Points to remember and Quotable Quotes

Definition of Agile Tester-

“A professional tester who embraces change, collaborates well with both technical and businesspeople, and understands the concept of using tests to document requirements and drive development.”

  • Skills are important, but attitude counts more
  • An agile tester does not see herself as a quality police officer, protecting her customers from inadequate code.
  • Agile testers don’t limit themselves to solving only testing issues.
  • Creativity, openness to ideas, willingness to take on any task or role, focus on the customer and a constant view of the big picture – are some components of the agile testing mindset.
  • A team that guides itself with agile values and principles will have higher team morale and better velocity than a poorly functioning team of talented individuals.
  • The principles important for agile testers are –
    • Provide continuous feedback
    • Deliver value to customer
    • Enable face-to-face communication
    • Have courage
    • Keep it Simple
    • Practice continuous improvement
    • Respond to change
    • Self-organize
    • Focus on people
    • Enjoy
  • AATD “Agile Attention Deficit Disorder” – Anything not learned quickly might be deemed useless!
  • Automating tests is hard, but it is much easier when you have the whole team working together.
  • Agile development rewards the agile tester’s passion for her work!

I had written an article about differences between Agile and Traditional testing approaches a few years back. Though I had not read this book at the time, I now feel how many of the points were similar and resonate the same even now. You can read my article here – https://testwithnishi.com/2016/10/20/5-ways-agile-testing-is-different-from-traditional-testing/

***Update **About face-to-face communication** during Covid-19 ***

As I am reading this book during this bizarre time of social-distancing, working remotely and entire nations on lockdown, the part about ‘face-to-face’ communication has a new meaning now. As Janet Gregory also pointed out in response to this article, our definition of face-to-face has changed over the last few weeks over the entire world! We are lucky to have technology that helps us continue effective communication within our teams, have conversations, video calls, screen shares, continue learning over webinars and continue working, feeling useful and being productive.

Hoping things change soon and we can go back to having fun, productive discussions with our team mates over coffee. Until then — Happy social distancing!

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Blind Spots in Software Testing

Reduced awareness or unintended ignorance of certain aspects can lead to inattentional blindness, or the failure to notice something that should have been visible because our attention was engaged elsewhere. As a human psychological concept, inattentional blindness also plagues testers and their mindset when testing. In my latest article for Testrail blog, I look at some steps we can take to overcome this challenge and avoid blind spots in our testing work.

Target Fixation

It is a natural response of our brain to avoid getting overloaded with information. It automatically focuses on information that is most important while avoiding unnecessary details and noise.

In many situations, this manifests in our focus on the task at hand and its context so much that we neglect surrounding details. This is true for day-to-day activities like bumping into a pillar while looking at our phones, failing to see a swerving car when watching the road ahead… or not noticing a takeaway coffee cup in the middle of a popular television show set in ancient times!

Let’s say you are browsing through a website with the intention of looking at the layouts that must match provided mockups. While you are doing that, you may miss the following:

  • The homepage of the website has an older logo of the company that should have been replaced by the newer version.
  • The login box has username and password fields but the login button is missing.
  • The URL structure of the website is all wonky and the individual page URLs are not named correctly.

Overlooked Information

Testers often execute tests that have defined steps and expected results, so we frequently overlook anything that is not defined and only check for the results we’re looking for. The tester’s mind is attuned to looking for specified errors, while other information or defects may tend to get missed, even though they may be right in front of our eyes.
Pick up any passed test case and try to re-execute it, but this time keep an open eye and an open mind for any new information surrounding the test. More often than not, you will find that many more defects, risk areas or questions can be found in the same area, despite the test having passed.

Read More—>

Read complete article at https://blog.gurock.com/blind-spots-software-testing/

How Technology Has Changed Project Management

The use of advanced technology in business environments can sometimes be jarring. Adjustments can be difficult, and on top of that many employees across a range of industries worry that technology can make them obsolete. These can be legitimate concerns in some cases. But, more often than not, technology serves instead to simplify processes and, ultimately, make life easier on people as they go about performing their jobs. This is certainly proving to be the case where project management is concerned.

Project management demands and processes vary across different businesses and industries, which means that not all teams in this category can implement modern technology in exactly the same ways. Here we’ll examine a few key ways in which tech can and has changed project management for the better.

Communication & File Sharing

Maybe the biggest change that technology has brought about for project management teams is a simplification of communication among groups in a work setting. In 2019, our post on ‘Overcoming Barriers to Effective Communications in Agile Teams’ touched on the idea that various barriers to regular communication can negatively impact productivity. And the same is absolutely true for project management teams of all kinds.

Now, however, there are several different communications platforms that are being used in professional environments to streamline collaboration. Often enough, they’re used to simplify digital communications in office environments in general, providing a space where everyone from a manager to a part-time freelancer can log in, see shared information, engage in relevant chats, and generally stay up to speed. These platforms can also be invaluable for project management teams.

For instance, think about a fairly common project such as developing a website or an app for a business. These are projects that involve contributions from people with different skills in conjunction with one another. A page design can’t be completed without understanding of the content layout; content layout can’t be finalized without a thoroughly developed visual aesthetic, and so on. On these modern communication platforms, these matters can easily be discussed between relevant parties such that the greater project can move forward. Updates and examples can be shared, and people can easily work with relevant collaborators whenever they need to.

Collaborative Design

In the past, one issue that plagued some project management teams is how to get everyone on the same page in more multi-faceted projects. There haven’t always been structured ways for different aspects of one overarching project to be addressed in a cohesive manner. This is changing, however, thanks in large part to both abstract and specific software.

Read More »