Is Excel holding back your testing?

My guest post @PractiTest QA Learning center

As testers, we all worked with Excel at some point in our career. If you are using
excel now this article is for you 🙂 Excel is used as test management, documentation
and reporting tool by many test teams. At early stages, most teams rely on excel
spreadsheets for planning and documenting tests, as well as reporting test
results. As teams grow, sharing information using excel sheets becomes problematic.
What used to be easy and intuitive, becomes very challenging. Encountering
difficult work scenarios like the below, becomes a day-to-day reality:

  • The simple task of figuring out which excel has the test cases you need to run, takes longer and longer.
  • Gathering the status of the testing tasks and your project can only be done by going to each desk one by one and asking them.
  • A tester mistakenly spent 6 hours running wrong tests in the wrong environment because of an incorrect excel sheet which was not the updated copy.
  • Tester’s routinely lose their work or test results because of saving/ overwriting or losing their excel sheets.
  • Most test activities are not being documented or accounted for because writing tests is considered a luxury.

excel--img

If one or more of these scenarios sound familiar to you, you are being held back in
your testing efforts by excel!

In my latest guest post for PractiTest, I have written about how excel can be a roadblock instead of a useful tool for your testing. To read the complete article, click here—->

In here I talk about issues related with use of excel in relation to

  • Visibility within the test team
  • Configuration Management of test items
  • Test Planning and Execution
  • Test Status and Reporting

Please give it a read and share your thoughts!

Cheers!

Nishi

 

The Value of Risk-Based Testing from an Agile ViewPoint

When I first heard about risk-based testing, I interpreted it as an approach that could help devise a targeted test strategy. Back then I was working with a product-based research and development team. We were following Scrum and were perpetually working with tight deadlines. These short sprints had lots to test and deliver, in addition to the cross-environment and non-functional testing aspects.

Learning about risk-based testing gave me a new approach to our testing challenges. I believed that analyzing the product as well as each sprint for the impending risk areas and then following them through during test design and development, execution and reporting would help us in time crunches.

But before I could think about adopting this new found approach into our test planning, I had a challenge at hand: to convince my team.

In my recent article published at Gurock’s blog site , I have written about my experience on exploring risk based testing and convincing my agile team about its importance and relevance using their own sprints’ case study.

Using the analysis of a sprint’s user stories, calculating Risk Priority Number (RPN) and the Extent of Testing defined, I was able to showcase in my own team’s case study, ways our testing could benefit and better itself by following risk based approach in a simplified manner.

Risk Priority Number

To read the complete article, Click Here–> 

In the article I talk about–

  • Tackling the Agile Challenges
  • Benchmarking Risks and a Focused Approach
  • Improving Test Process and Results

Do share your thoughts on Risk Based Testing!

Cheers

Nishi

 

 

 

A simplified Agile Test Strategy for Cross Environment Testing

Cross environment testing is viewed as a tedious and repetitive task and is generally a challenge to accommodate within an agile life cycle. In my recent guest post for Gurock, I showcased my own experience in an agile release wherein we created a strategy for coverage of a number of test environments to support.

Using simple steps, discussions, base-lining and agreement within the scrum team, we created a scalable interoperability test strategy which was later supplemented with automation and other tools. In this article I have talked about-

  • Testing across OS versions
  • Supporting System versions
  • Localization- multiple language support
  • Planning and Test Strategy creation
  • Additional Ownership by testers

To read more, click here.

Give it a read and share your thoughts-

https://blog.gurock.com/agile-cross-environment-testing/

Print

Thanks

Nishi

Guest Post- “5 Tips to manage your Outsourced testing”

Want to Outsource your testing? Here are my “5 tips to manage your outsourced testing”

I have begun collaborating with PractiTest and with the help of Rachel, my article has now been published @PractiTest Learning Center.

In this article I have discussed about the practical risks for teams that outsource their testing efforts. I have brought forward 5 key tips and tricks to manage their outsourced software testing along with team and people issues as follows:

  • Treat Them like your Team
  • Invest in training the Outsourced Team
  • Meet often, and also in person
  • Centralised System for Test Management
  • Account for Cultural Differences

Please give it a read and share your thoughts!

https://www.practitest.com/qa-learningcenter/thank-you/manage-your-outsourced-testing/

Thanks

Nishi

The huge success of Selenium Summit 2018 – a peek into my day at the grand event

Thanks to the fantastic organisation and management of our team and the amazing enthusiasm of the attending delegates, Selenium Summit 2018 organised by ATA at Pune on 22nd March 2018 was a huge success! All keynote talks were greatly appreciated and the hands-on workshops also were received well.

My workshop on “Selenium and Cucumber integration for an extended BDD Framework” received overwhelming response from the audience with more than a full house! 🙂

Here is a glimpse into the event and a sneak peek into the workshop too-

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Agenda

Thanks everyone who made this event a grand success!

-Nishi

 

 

I am speaking at the ‘Selenium Summit 2018’ @Pune

Hello!

Check it out!

I am speaking at the Selenium Automation Summit 2018 being organised on 22nd March 2018 by ATA @ Pune.

Find more details about the event at : http://seleniumsummit18.agiletestingalliance.org/

I will be presenting a 90 minute- hands-on workshop on:

“Selenium with Cucumber for an extended BDD Framework”

Are you interested in looking into the trend of Behavior Driven Development? Would you like to see it in action using Cucumber? Would you like to integrate your functional tests in such a framework using integration of Selenium within Cucumber? Then this is the workshop for you!

This workshop will cover

  • Practical issues faced by most testing teams
  • Behavior Driven Development – the definition and need
  • Extending the Agile User stories and acceptance criteria in BDD scenarios
  • Cucumber as a BDD tool
  • Integration of Cucumber with Selenium in order to perform functional tests
  • Demo using Cucumber with Selenium with a real use case
  • Usage and Benefits of BDD In agile teams

Let’s meet there!

-Nishi

Guest Post- “5 Ways DevOps complements Agile”

My guest post article for Gurock Software GmbH #TestRail blog is now up!!

“5 Ways DevOps complements Agile” – As an industry practitioner who has worked in agile for almost a decade now, I have always seen DevOps as a friend and an extension of agile. Using this article I have tried to put across my view on how this handshake between developers and operations personnel works in favor of bridging the gap from software creation to software delivery.- 

Please give it a read at – https://blog.gurock.com/5-ways-devops-complements-agile/

The major points I have touched upon in this article are –devops

  • A Focus on User’s Needs

  • Continuous Delivery

  • Concentrated Value Creation

  • Motivated Individuals

  • A Culture of Inclusion

 

To read more click here->

Cheers

Nishi

 

Training on Selenium – CP-SAT Certification Batches @Bangalore

CP-SAT stands for “Certified Practitioner – Selenium Automation Testing” is a certification prepared and honoured by “Agile Testing Alliance” & “University Teknologi Malaysia (UTM)”, which is the Selenium training course I have been conducting in Bangalore. We conducted a public batch over the last weekend as well as a corporate batch this month where participants got to build, enhance and maintain the scripts in Eclipse IDE and Selenium 3.x WebDriver.

Training Approach:   This course is designed to train agile professionals with the basics of testing web applications using Selenium leading to advanced topics. I approached the training as a combination of theory as well as hands-on execution of scripts using the features of Selenium with ample time given to practice and kept the focus on the practical application of Selenium to resolve common web automated testing challenges.

Agenda: This course focuses on latest Selenium 3.x, its advantages,  WebDriver 3.x configuration and execution related concepts using JUnit and TestNG frameworks, Selenium Reporting mechanism, Data Driven Testing, getting started with Selenium Grid concepts, handling various types of web elements, iframes, dynamic lists etc. To know more about course syllabus – please click here

Course Schedule: The course consists of 3 full days of training, hands on assignments and practical, continuing on later with 5 days of 2-hour web sessions live with the trainer for more learning and queries and clarifications. Thereafter the candidates are given a mock exam to attempt which gives an idea about the real certification exam. The final exam consists of 2 sections – Theory which is Online Objective type Quiz and Practical which a 2 hour exam with given case studies implementation and submission.

We have received tremendous response from the CP-SAT training batches and many more interested candidates for upcoming scheduled training sessions at Bangalore.

Here is a sneak peek into the training room and also some wonderful feedback shared by our candidates-

Public CP-SAT Batch @Bangalore

Corporate CP-SAT Batch @Bangalore

If interested please check the upcoming batches calendar at – http://ataevents.agiletestingalliance.org/

Happy Learning!
Nishi

 

 

 

 

Better Software Design Ideas for the Hawaii Emergency Alert System

Continuing the discussion on the Hawaii Missile Alert which made headlines in January 2018 and turned out to be a false alarm and ended up raising panic amongst almost a million people of the state all for nothing, (read here for detailed report) I would like to bring back the focus on implications of poor software design leading to such human errors.

Better software design is aimed at making the software easier to use, fit for its purpose and improving the overall experience of the user. While software design focuses on making all features easily accessible, understandable and usable, it also can be directed at making the user aware of all possibilities and implications before performing their actions. Certain actions, if critical, can and should be made more discrete than the others, may have added security or authorisations and visual hints indicating their critical nature.

Some of the best designers at freelancer.com came together to brainstorm ideas for better software design and to revamp the Hawaii government’s inept designs. They ran a contest amongst themselves to come up with the best designs that could avoid such a fiasco in future.

Sarah Danseglio, from East Meadow, New York, took home the $150 grand prize, while Renan M. of Brazil and Lyza V. of the Philippines scored $100 and $75 for coming in 2nd and 3rd, respectively.

Here is a sneak peek into how they designed the improved system :Read More »

Exploratory Testing using “Tours”

My latest article for stickyminds.com “https://www.stickyminds.com/article/using-tours-structure-your-exploratory-testing” talks about using TOURS to enhance the exploratory tests you perform and add more structure and direction to them.

Here is my experience report on using Tours in my testing project-

WHAT ARE TOURS —

In testing, a tour is an exploration of a product that is organized around a theme. Tours bring structure and direction to exploration sessions, so they can be used as a fundamental tool for exploratory testing. They’re excellent for surfacing a collection of ideas that you can then further explore in depth one at a time, and they help you become more familiar with a product—leading to better testing.

I had just started working with a new product, a web-based platform that was a fairly complex system with a large number of components, each with numerous features. Going into each component and inside every feature would take too much time; I needed a quick, broad overview and some feedback points I could share as queries or defects with my team.

I realized my exploration of the application would need some structure around it. Using test sessions and predefined charters, I could explore set areas and come back with relevant observations—I had discovered tours.

Cem Kaner describes tours as an exploration of a product that is organized around a theme. Tours help bring structure and a definite direction to exploration sessions, so they can be used as a fundamental tool for exploratory testing.

Tours are excellent for surfacing a collection of ideas that you can then further explore in depth one at a time. Tours testing provides a structure to the tester on the way they go about exploring the system, so they can have a particular focus on each part and not overlook a component. The structure is combined with a theme of the tour, which provides a base for the kind of questions to ask and the type of observations that need to be made.

In the course of conducting a tour, testers can find bugs, raise questions, uncover interesting aspects and features of the software, and create models, all done on the basis of the theme of the tour being performed.

Let’s discuss some common types of tours that are useful for testers and look at some examples.

Testing Tours

Read More »