Components of a Defect Management Software

 Since software developers and testers work together in the Agile and DevOps environments, it gets challenging to cope up with the increasing competition. Development teams work in collaboration with various stakeholders to make the most of the testing efforts. Defects in software applications are a norm, the sooner you realize that better it is. It is impossible to have a 100% defect/error-free software application, but experts work to make the most of their efforts. The current need for faster delivery and quality products calls for robust software testing solutions that can meet customer expectations.

A defect management system is a defect repository where all the defects appearing in a system are identified, recorded and assigned for rectification. This system includes defect management software and defect management tools to achieve projects efficiently. 

How Does Defect Management Work?

A defect management system works in a systematic manner, and records all the defects in the system without duplicating defects, and maintaining a log for future use too. There are different steps involved in the defect management that are explained below”

Identification – First of all, testers identify the defects

Categorize – When it is reported, it is automatically assigned to a team member to assess whether to rectify the defect or leave it

Prioritize – The next step is to prioritize by assessing the severity of defect and its impact on the user. The prioritized defects are handled by a formal change control board. 

Assigning Defects – After   the defects, they are then assigned to developers or testers accordingly 

Resolving Defects – The develope resolves the defect and follows the process to move further in the defect management process

Verification – The software testing team verifies the environment in which the defect was found

Closure – Close the defects after completion

Reporting – Reports are then provided to the relevant stakeholders regularly. They can also be demanded according to requirements. 

The entire process sounds pretty simple and easy, although it is not so. Defect management is tricky but using the right type of defect management software and tools helps in achieving the desired results. These tools are also integrated with other software testing tools to enhance and align all the processes between testers, developers and other relevant stakeholders. It aids all experts and specialists in planning, building and developing a quality software product. Business analysts, product managers, developers, project managers, testers. etc. is operating in a single system by sharing the same information. Defect management tools are also integrated with the test management system, which helps testing teams to share the project status with other key stakeholders. 

All these stages of defect management process contribute to a defect management software. Generally, defects are always considered negative, which may not be the case in all instances. Sometimes a tester makes a mistake while recording the defect, which can affect the entire process. So we can’t truly say that a defect management software or tool alone is responsible for effective defect management, it is also important to handle the defects efficiently. 


This is a guest post by Ray Parker

Author Bio:Ray Parker is a senior marketing consultant with a knack for writing about the latest news in tech, quality assurance, software development and testing. With a decade of experience working in the tech industry, Ray now dabbles out of his New York office.

What can you learn from the defects you found?

The bugs we find during testing can tell us a lot about the application, the state of its quality and its release-readiness. Bugs can also provide insights into our development processes and practices — and lapses therein.

How can we study bugs to improve the overall state of our project? In my article published @Gurock TestRail blog, I have described three things to learn from the bugs you find. https://blog.gurock.com/three-learn-bugs/

 The location of defect clusters

Defect clustering is one of the seven principles of software testing, and keeping an eye out for these clusters is the responsibility of a good tester.

As we log defects into a tracking tool or portal, teams generally follow the practice of measuring relevant modules, components or functional areas against each defect. When tracked over time, this information can be real gold! It helps us track which areas of the application are having more bugs.

We can plot these area metrics against the number of defects raised and find the defect rates over time. We can also create filters to raise concerns whenever the defect rates go over a certain limit in any specific area or component. This can help us combat defect clustering by doing a fresh analysis, revisiting the tests being performed and focusing more of our exploratory test efforts in those areas.

Overall, knowing about these defect clusters, keeping an eye out for them and regularly revisiting the areas will help us keep the quality of the entire system in check.

Frequency of defects (and their resolution)

The frequency of defects being found and logged tells us a lot about the maturity of the product.

In the beginning of construction sprints, defects are supposed to be frequent and plentiful. We may not go by numbers here, but the relativity of them. As we progress toward a release, the number of defects generally declines, indicating that the system is now more mature and sturdier after withstanding multiple test cycles. Some teams even use the metric of mean time between failures as an exit criterion for testing, indicating that they will only finish testing once they cannot find any new defect for a certain number of days.

As defects are raised, triaged, resolved and verified, there is a typical turnaround time that we expect. Most defects will go through this lifecycle within a reasonable stipulated time or will be postponed with a reason or business decision. Some defects may linger in the system for longer.

There may be a variety of reasons for these decisions:

  • A defect requires more information, and the developer is awaiting confirmation or details from the tester who raised it
  • The defect was misunderstood and there are comments going back and forth between the tester and developer about the expected behavior
  • The assigned developer was on vacation for a week and the defects have not been fixed, leading to a plateau in the defect-fix-rate graph
  • Defects are awaiting triage by the product owner and do not have priorities or the correct people assigned to them

Whatever the reason, knowing the cause of defects remaining open, in progress or unresolved for longer than a stipulated time is important. We may have to fix people issues or communication gaps, or may just need to schedule a short triage or discussion with the team to decide on the fate of such issues. But understanding any delays gives us a much-needed insight into team dynamics and helps us smooth out the process.

The reasons behind rejected defects

The number and type of defects getting rejected — and the reasons behind the rejections — can also tell us a lot about the state of the product and psychology of the team. If you see a high number of irreproducible defects, it may mean that some data or information is getting lost when reporting, or that the testers do not have enough time or perspective to reproduce the defects.

A high number of duplicate bugs may show that testers are unaware of the system’s history, or maybe they are new to the team and need to get a little more background. It may also be a case of the same bugs reoccurring, which might have been fixed and closed in previous releases.

Incorrect defects marked with “Not a bug” or “Working as designed” tell us about a lack of understanding of the system on the testers’ side. Or it may be due to a lack of communication among the team members, leading to different perceptions about the features that were designed or implemented.

Our findings from these types of defects can help test managers or project owners plan measures like internal trainings and knowledge sharing, which can enhance communication among team members and introduce prerequisites to fulfill before logging any issues.

There is a world of information that your defects can provide. If you take a good look at your bugs and talk about them as a team, you can find ways to use that information to your advantage.

Read more–> Click here for the full article

Happy Testing!

What the NAPLAN Fail Tells Us About Testing in Education?

Implications of Software Testing in the field of Education

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) are school tests administered to Australian students. This August, the online program was offered to 1.5 million students. Students failed to log on. 

Had the software undergone functional testing, the program could have launched successfully. A functional testing company verifies every function of the software function as per requirements. It is a black box type of testing where the internal structure of the product is not known to the tester.

Functional and Performance Issues – Naplan’s problem has been ongoing. In March, it took students 80 minutes to get to online tests. The requirement was of 5 minutes. The software performed shockingly different from what was planned. 30,000 students had to retake tests, which too were marred by technical glitches. The test data was not automatically saved. The data recovery time was 15 minutes compared to the requirement of zero minutes. Once again, the software did not perform as expected. Eventually, the problem was resolved, however, it came at the expense of dropouts and time lags. 

Accessibility Issues – Naplan software had other errors that a functional testing company could have taken care of. The features that were designed for students with disabilities were not functional. Alternate text for students was missing, incorrect and inaccessible for students with auditory disabilities. The color contrast was poor. The color contrast was of immense importance to those who required accessibility help with seeing visuals. 

In the Naplan case, a functional testing company would prepare several test cases to verify the functionality of the login page, accessibility features, load times and data recovery times against the requirements specified. Functional testing would cover unit testing, integration testing, interface testing, and regression testing. In addition to manual testing, a functional testing company would perform automation testing. Software testing tools automate tests to improve the accuracy and speed of execution.

Naplan’s online system was reviewed by PricewaterhouseCoopers to reflect these problems. The report nails down the cause of the issues to a lack of automation testing, “[Education Services Australia] continues to work with [Education technology provider] Janison and Microsoft to improve upon the current recovery time of 80 minutes and recovery point of 15 minutes, and believe that eventually an automated service may become possible, however, the current environment is unable to do so.” 

What do we learn?

Naplan’s fail tells us that software testing in the field of education is as important as in other industries like healthcare and banking. Modern school systems rely heavily on online resources, not simply for research but also for exam and course work. As schools shift from traditional paper-based teaching methods to electronic systems, they must remember to test their software in sync with technological demands.

Without robust testing, school systems can be severely impacted.

  • The administrative costs would go up in rescheduling exams for students.
  • The school would also lose credibility as students will mock the sluggish approach.
  • Students who are dedicated to working will become demotivated. ‌
  • Positive school culture is likely to dwindle.

Before that happens, educational institutions must think of software testing!

This is a guest post by Ray Parker

Author Bio:

Ray Parker is a senior marketing consultant with a knack for writing about the latest news in tech, quality assurance, software development and travel. With a decade of experience working in the tech industry, Ray now dabbles out of his New York office.

Scrum, Kanban & Scrumban – What’s the difference?

Agile is a big umbrella that covers a number of different approaches, and there is always scope for more. There are so many flavors because agile is a mindset that allows flexibility in its processes. Two of the more popular approaches are Scrum and Kanban.

Scrum and Kanban apply agile principles in their own way to empower effective delivery cycles. “Scrumban” is a term coined for a hybrid approach making use of both Scrum and Kanban principles.

In my article published at Testrail , I have explore the differences among the three methodologies – Scrum , Kanban and Scrumban. Check it out and see which of these methodologies may be right for you. https://blog.gurock.com/scrum-kanban-scrumban/

Here is a brief about the 3 methodologies –

SCRUM

Scrum is the most popular agile framework. It is iterative and incremental in nature and focuses on tight delivery timelines. The release time frame is split into small iterations called sprints. Work items are planned for each sprint in the form of user stories and tasks, which are prioritized based on value. Teams are small, cross-functional and self-organizing, with a product owner, a ScrumMaster and the development team.

Scrum provides channels for communication through ceremonies such as the sprint planning meeting, the daily standup meeting, the sprint demo, and the sprint retrospective, all of which contribute to the overall pace and a flexible approach to software development.

Scrum Task board

KANBAN

Kanban is focused on continuous delivery based on lean principles. It’s based on the flow of work and just-in-time delivery and promotes process improvement. Kanban aims to eliminate waste, increase productivity and efficiency, and have flexibility in production. The main goals are to limit work in progress (WIP), avoid multitasking and recognize bottlenecks.

The Kanban board essentially consists of three phases: Input, Work in Progress and Output. Columns under each designation can be used to signify more important tasks and priorities. The tasks in backlog are added to the board with small descriptions and are assigned to team members using the “pull” principle, based on priorities.

Here is a useful sketch I found to illustrate the difference between Scrum & Kanban–

Differences- Scrum vs Kanban

SCRUMBAN

First introduced a decade ago by Corey Ladas, Scrumban was intended as a transitional state for Scrum teams moving to Kanban but later emerged as a framework of its own. It now leverages elements of Scrum and Kanban and focuses on continuous work with short cycles for planning.

Fundamentally, Scrumban is a management framework that emerges when teams employ Scrum as their chosen way of working but use Kanban as a way to view and understand work and continuously improve their processes.

Tasks are taken up using the “pull” principle from the backlog of items on the board, so people can decide to take up the task they want. WIP limits are used to avoid bottlenecks and delays. Once all current backlog items are done and the backlog column is empty, it is a trigger for the next planning, so planning happens on-demand as needed.

Scrumban board

Please click here to read the full article — > on the Gurock TestRail blog site.

Please like, comment and follow the blog for more interesting articles!

Thanks

Nishi

4 ways Task boards can help Agile teams

A task board is a physical or virtual chart containing all current team tasks at hand and their progress over time. For an agile team, all sprint tasks can be represented on the task board, and their flow over various stages can be tracked in the daily standup meeting. Task boards are a great way to visually representing pieces of work and their status.

Besides helping to organize and track work and being the focal point of the iteration and relevant meetings, task boards can have numerous more benefits for an agile team. In my article published @Gurock, I have discussed four additional ways in which Task boards can help an agile team-> https://blog.gurock.com/agile-task-boards/

Different styles of Task boards

Main points discussed–>

  • Customize the process
  • Visualize their Scrum
  • Improve Commitment and visibility
  • Facilitate Team interactions

Click here to read more ->

‘Co-opetetion’ Among Agile Team Members

Agile focuses on motivated individuals acting together toward a common goal. Consequently, agile needs people to collaborate and requires complete transparency, communication, and cooperation, within and across teams. But at the same time, individuals instinctively try to outperform others in order to stand out in their teams.

This transition from individual responsibility to collective ownership is often the hardest part of the cultural shift that teams face when adopting agile. I have looked at ways to encourage healthy competition, more cooperation, and a sense of community among agile teammates in my latest article for Gurock – TestRail blog, the main points being-

  • Showing People the part they played
  • Have Co-workers appreciate each other
  • Measuring personal growth
  • Motivating with extra initiatives
  • Encouraging Collaboration and healthy competetion

Check out the complete article at – https://blog.gurock.com/agile-co-opetiton/ to find ways to encourage healthy competition and better team dynamics in your agile teams!

Four Questions to ask yourself when planning Test Automation

Test automation poses its own challenges different from manual testing. Teams struggle to get the most out of their test automation due to many hurdles along the way.

Good planning can act as a solid foundation for your test automation project and help you fully reap the benefits. Consequently, there are many things to consider and discuss prior to jumping into test automation to ensure you are following the right path.

In my article published at Gurock TestRail Blog, I have discussed four main questions to ask yourself before starting with test automation-

  1. What is your team’s goal for test automation?
  2. What about implementation?
  3. What is your execution strategy?
  4. Who will focus on maintenance?

Read the full article here to find more on each of these questions and how these help to finalize on a test automation strategy which will help lead your team to success!

Please give this article a read and share your thoughts!

Cheers

Nishi

5 Mistakes to Avoid When Adopting a New Tool

We are all forever on the lookout for better and faster ways to achieve our quality goals, and adding new tools to our suite often seems like a good way to do that. However, introducing a new tool to an already working environment may be tricky and could require some special considerations.

In my latest article for @Gurock website, I take a look at five common mistakes teams make when adopting a new tool, so we can be sure to avoid them. My write-up has been published at TestRail blog here -> https://blog.gurock.com/5-mistakes-tool-adoption/

The main mistakes in tool adoption and their prevention steps that I have discussed in this article are:

  • Jumping in without a POC
  • Not testing the tool in a Pilot Project
  • Performing the wrong Profit analysis
  • Rolling Out adoption all at once
  • Neglecting Continuous Learning

Read the full article and let me know your thoughts!

Using Mind Maps for Agile Test Planning

Mind maps are a creative way of gathering ideas around a central theme and categorizing them in concrete branches. Mind maps can be useful for both personal and professional life as an organization and visualization technique. They’re descriptive, easy and even fun.

In my latest post for Gurock blog, I showcase the usage of mind maps as a technique for test planning and test design. This tool’s capabilities make your documentation leaner and ideas more visual, which benefits the whole agile team.
https://blog.gurock.com/agile-mind-map/

Be it test planning in an agile team which needs entire team’s insights and collaboration, or categorization of product features, test areas and backlog, Mindmaps can be used for all aspects and phases of the project.

Testers can generate their test ideas and have them categorized in a mind map around the central theme of the feature. The visual nature of a mind map helps them find more scenarios, see which parts are more heavily tested, and focus on main areas or branches. Once done, they can have other stakeholders take a look at it and get their opinions. This fosters brainstorming together and gathers the maximum number of ideas from the entire team.

Find useful tips to create your own mindmaps, as well as some samples for your reference in agile test designing as well as test planning. Read the complete article here ->
https://blog.gurock.com/agile-mind-map/

Share your thoughts!

Making the case for Usability Testing in Agile

My first experience with usability testing was on an agile team where the product we were building was being designed with the help of an in-house usability expert. He helped design the user interface (UI) of the application and conduct usability study on the beta version of the software to determine the ease of use of the application.

Though the experience was limited in terms of the interaction we had with the user representatives and the sessions conducted, the feedback we received opened up lots of new avenues for the tester in me around the learnability, understandability and attractiveness of the application I was testing.

Usability has matured a lot over the years. It’s now an essential software characteristic in today’s web and mobile applications. In my article published at the TestRail blog, I discuss ways of performing Usability tests and developing a mindset for Usability in an agile context.

https://blog.gurock.com/usability-testing-agile-projects/

We also discuss about Usability Study , how to set it up and achieve maximum benefits from it.

To read the complete article — (opens in a new tab)”>Click here –>