Read Along – ‘The Effortless Experience’- Chapter 8

“Effort Beyond the Contact Center”

Non-contact center applications of the Low Effort concept-

Customer Effort in Retail

Most critical factors when it comes to customer effort in retail environment are

“Navigability” – How easy it is for customers to find what they are looking for

“Issue Resolution” – How easy it is for customers to get help solving some problem.

Customer Effort in Product Design

Simplicity of design and ease of use really make certain products stand out in a crowd.

  • Apple’s ease of use is legendary.
  • Bose is another consumer electronics company that just ‘gets’ the idea of low effort. They put simple color-coded tags on wires that match the color of the jacks they plug into. Easy stuff!
  • TurboTax uses intuitive, plain-English, question based approach to helping taxpayers do their taxes.

Customer Effort in Purchase Experience

Decision Simplicity – Simplifying a consumer’s purchase decision

comes down to 3 things-

  • Making it easy for consumers to navigate information about the brand
  • Providing information that is noteworthy
  • Making it simple for consumers to weight their options

Effort should be reduced throughout the customer life-cycle.

Reducing effort in pre- and post-sales customer touch-points has measurable loyalty impact.

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The Best companies Live low-effort.

Top brands are adopting the principle of a low-effort experience across multiple facets of their business, from product design to the sales experience.

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Read Along – ‘The Effortless Experience’- Chapter 7

“Making Low Effort Stick”

Reducing customer effort represents a cultural shift in how your team engages with customers and how you’ll prioritise the projects you undertake. But while it’s easy to say, any shift of this nature is difficult to accomplish, mainly because change in a large organisation can be an arduous undertaking.

Taking First Steps

Have a compelling ‘change story’ to communicate Why the change is needed, and make the business case of change. It then becomes the backbone of all communication, training, coaching and general reinforcement.

The most Important Change Agents

Focusing efforts on Coaching instead of Training.

Coaching is —

  • Focusing on improving future performance
  • Ongoing
  • Equally driven by coach and coachee
  • Tailored to individual’s development needs

Two types of Coaching tends to occur-

a) Scheduled coaching – sit-down discussions with supervisor to review calls, discuss performance and take corrective action. This might be more punitive than developmental. Over-emphasizing on this type of coaching leads to lower-performing teams.

b) Integrated Coaching – On-the-job coaching, in close proximity to specific customer situations that the coaching is designed to improve. Supervisors who over-emphasize this type of coaching realise a lift of more than 12% in their team’s performance.

The best supervisors focus roughly 75% of their coaching on integrated coaching.

Make It Real

Use creative approaches to help teams quickly understand what qualifies as more or less effort for the customer.

>Sharing of personal customer experiences – Have teams share bad customer service experiences from their personal lives.

>Group quality assurance sessions– Prescreen old customer calls and discuss high effort instances to build awareness and socialise the idea of customer effort reduction.

>Customer Effort Diaries – Get together and share their specific stories – capture specific instances when each person felt they did a great job of reducing effort.

Key Lessons from Early Adopters

Don’t make Effort Reduction another ‘Ask’

Reducing the no. of things frontline staff are being asked to focus on means that they can make effort reduction more of a priority, not just another ask.

The commitment to reducing effort, and the permanence of that approach, needs to become a shift in expectations, not just a new expectation added to the top of the pile.

“In order to get new behaviours to take hold, old behaviours have to be retired”

Baby Steps

  • Start with a small number of ways to reduce effort to make the shift more tangible to your teams.
  • This way, people know precisely what to do, and they develop a more refined sense for how effort reduction works.
  • Supervisors also have a finite set of behaviours to coach for.

Narrowly scope initial pilot expectations for your teams. This may include forward-resolving a specific type of service issue, or using positive language techniques for some common issues.

Lay the Cultural Foundation

Effort reduction is not a quick-hit project. It is service philosophy.

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Reducing effort is an ongoing challenge you will need to continuously support.

You need lots of top-down communication, good manager and supervisor support, and the right metrics.

Your priorities should be a great change story, significant coaching discipline, and clearly signalling the expectation that a low-effort experience should be the goal with every customer.

Making it easy for your teams to take the first steps towards reducing effort will ensure your likelihood of success!

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Read Along – ‘The Effortless Experience’- Chapter 6

The Disloyalty Detector – Customer Effort Score v2.0

Measuring customer effort shines a spotlight on the service experience and can bring new levels of claity to what we can do to improve it.

Customer Satisfaction (CSAT)

CSAT is a poor predictor of a customer’s intent to repurchase and to increase spend.

Net Promoter Score (NPS)

NPS is a ‘big question’ that captures a customer’s holistic impression of their relationship with a company. The problem is it isn’t the best metric for understanding customer service performance at a transactional level.

Customer Effort Score (CES)

CES gives managers a simple way to understand whether they have accomplished low-effort experience from one interaction to the next, across different channels and divisions in their organisations , and over time. And, importantly, it offers a way to immediately spot customers at risk of defection.

CES metric is based on a statement “The company made it easy for me to handle my issue”

This is a survey question asked to the user at the end of an interaction. This new question CES v2.0 is more reliable and is less prone to misinterpretation as compared to CES v1.0 statement “How much effort did you personally have to put forth to get your issue resolved?”

When comparing CES v2.0 to CSAT, the effort measure is 12% more predictive of customer loyalty.

Systemically Finding and Eliminating Drivers of Effort

A robust customer effort measurement system consists of 3 parts –

Connecting Company Loyalty goals with Customer Service Strategy and Objectives

Effort should be measured consistently across channels and the sources of effort systematically monitored. This will allow your service org to continually determine ways ri positively impact enterprise loyalty objectives.

Use CES to assess the ease of resolution in post-service surveys. CES provides a powerful indicator of transactional customer loyalty, clearly highlights friction points n the customer experience, and helps companies to spot customers at risk of defection due to high-effort interactions.

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Use an effort-measurement system. While CES is a powerful tool, there is no silver bullet when it comes to measuring customer effort.

The best companies collect data at multiple levels and from multiple sources to understand not just whether customer effort is happening, but also the root causes of effort.

**

Read Along – ‘The Effortless Experience’- Chapter 5

To Get Control, You have to Give Control

For the company and its strategic financial interest, a lot is riding on the skills and abilities of each and every rep in the front.

So, the most common people-management strategy is to minimize the risk by keeping a very tight rein on everything, including companies mandating the exact words each rep must use in all interactions, looking at Average Handle Time(AHT), employing checklists for Quality Assurance (QA) and dictating their every move.

But these strategies of yesterday’s successful companies are fast becoming antiquated and are. no longer sufficient and even actively harmful.

The fourth pillar in creating a world-class customer experience is that low-effort service organisations run their operations very differently and manage their people very differently.

In a low-effort service org, reps determine for themselves how best to handle the unique issue being experienced by this unique person.

80.5% of service orgs say their rep performance has not improved noticeably over the past couple of years. The main questions here are-

  • How can companies position their reps for success in today’s world?
  • If we want to deliver a low-effort experience, what skills matter most?

The List of skills clustered into four statistically defined categories –

IQ
Advanced Problem Solving

Curious
Creative
Capable of Critical Thinking
Experimental
3.6 % improvement in CSAT or in Net Promoter Score
Basic Skills and Behaviors
Demonstrates Product Knowledge
Demonstrates Technological experience
Communicates confidently, clearly
Asks good questions
Capable of multi-tasking
5.1% better performance
EQ
Emotional Intelligence

Has customer service ethic
Extroverted
Advocates for the customer
Persuasive
5.4% performance boost
CQ
Control Quotient

Resilient
Able to handle high-pressure situations
Takes responsibility of own actions
Responds well to constructive criticism by managers
Able to concentrate on tasks over extended periods of time
11.2% increase in Rep’s performance!
Performance Impact of Rep Skill Categories

The impact of CQ is abundantly clear. It is what it takes not just to engage with one customer, but to be able to disengage immediately afterward to be fully effective with the next person. Quit Taking It Personally!

Boosting CQ

It’s not the training. It’s not the people. It’s the work environment those people are subjected to on a daily basis that enables higher rep performance, a lower-effort customer experience, and ultimately loyalty benefits for the company.

3 distinct keys to unlocking CQ

Trust in rep judgement

This has 14% impact on CQ.

Do your employees feel trusted?

Customers have different personalities, needs and expectations. When a company mandates that every customer call include standard, company-imposed criteria or questions, it eliminates the natural, spontaneous, human level interaction and replaces with a mechanical, rote exchange.

So, instead we need to

a) Eliminate the Checklist Mentality

b) Remove the Pressure of Time

Rep understanding and alignment with company goals

Employees are more likely to exhibit ‘discretionary effort’ if they understand the connection between their everyday work and the overall big-picture mission of the organisation.

Reps who understand exactly how customer service ties directly to customer loyalty, which ties directly to strategic and financial outcomes are more likely to take control over their own individual interactions.

A strong rep peer support network

This has a 17% impact on CQ but is also the hardest to achieve.

3 conditions for maximum benefits of peer support to be realised:

  1. Adequate time – Make it easy. to help & support each other. It is a part of job and not a burden.
  2. True Best-practice sharing – Share how best to serve customers in complex situations, not suboptimal shortcuts or work arounds
  3. Receptive reps – Enable reps to help each other without being controlled by management to ensure better receptivity.

CQ isn’t learned, it is enabled.

Most reps already have moderate to high CQ potential. The problem is that most companies inhibit it due to an environment of strict adherence- Judgement and Control are not welcomed in these environments.

“Give control to get control of the front line.