Speaking at the DevOps & Agile Testing Summit – 8Nov’19, Bangalore

I was invited to speak at the DevOps and Agile testing Summit organised and conducted by 1.21GWs on 8th Nov 2019 at Bangalore. It was a great event which brought together many keen minds as delegates and many inspiring speakers. https://1point21gws.com/devops/bangalore/

My talk was on “The Building Blocks of a Robust Test Automation Strategy”. As we know testing teams are faced with a number of questions, decisions and challenges throughout their test automation journey. But there is no single solution for their varied problems! In this talk I outlined a number of strategies that agile teams can follow– be it their selection of what to automate and how much, what approaches to follow, whom to involve, and when to schedule these tasks so that the releases are of best quality.

I am grateful that my talk was so well received and led to great discussions later with many participants. I enjoyed the day and am always glad to be invited by the 1.21GWs team.

A peek into the event – pictures from my session

@Sahi Pro was also a knowledge partner at the event and delegates also got a peek into Sahi Pro via video and brochure handouts.

Looking forward to many more successful events! 🙂

Components of a Defect Management Software

 Since software developers and testers work together in the Agile and DevOps environments, it gets challenging to cope up with the increasing competition. Development teams work in collaboration with various stakeholders to make the most of the testing efforts. Defects in software applications are a norm, the sooner you realize that better it is. It is impossible to have a 100% defect/error-free software application, but experts work to make the most of their efforts. The current need for faster delivery and quality products calls for robust software testing solutions that can meet customer expectations.

A defect management system is a defect repository where all the defects appearing in a system are identified, recorded and assigned for rectification. This system includes defect management software and defect management tools to achieve projects efficiently. 

How Does Defect Management Work?

A defect management system works in a systematic manner, and records all the defects in the system without duplicating defects, and maintaining a log for future use too. There are different steps involved in the defect management that are explained below”

Identification – First of all, testers identify the defects

Categorize – When it is reported, it is automatically assigned to a team member to assess whether to rectify the defect or leave it

Prioritize – The next step is to prioritize by assessing the severity of defect and its impact on the user. The prioritized defects are handled by a formal change control board. 

Assigning Defects – After   the defects, they are then assigned to developers or testers accordingly 

Resolving Defects – The develope resolves the defect and follows the process to move further in the defect management process

Verification – The software testing team verifies the environment in which the defect was found

Closure – Close the defects after completion

Reporting – Reports are then provided to the relevant stakeholders regularly. They can also be demanded according to requirements. 

The entire process sounds pretty simple and easy, although it is not so. Defect management is tricky but using the right type of defect management software and tools helps in achieving the desired results. These tools are also integrated with other software testing tools to enhance and align all the processes between testers, developers and other relevant stakeholders. It aids all experts and specialists in planning, building and developing a quality software product. Business analysts, product managers, developers, project managers, testers. etc. is operating in a single system by sharing the same information. Defect management tools are also integrated with the test management system, which helps testing teams to share the project status with other key stakeholders. 

All these stages of defect management process contribute to a defect management software. Generally, defects are always considered negative, which may not be the case in all instances. Sometimes a tester makes a mistake while recording the defect, which can affect the entire process. So we can’t truly say that a defect management software or tool alone is responsible for effective defect management, it is also important to handle the defects efficiently. 


This is a guest post by Ray Parker

Author Bio:Ray Parker is a senior marketing consultant with a knack for writing about the latest news in tech, quality assurance, software development and testing. With a decade of experience working in the tech industry, Ray now dabbles out of his New York office.

Using Mind Maps for Agile Test Planning

Mind maps are a creative way of gathering ideas around a central theme and categorizing them in concrete branches. Mind maps can be useful for both personal and professional life as an organization and visualization technique. They’re descriptive, easy and even fun.

In my latest post for Gurock blog, I showcase the usage of mind maps as a technique for test planning and test design. This tool’s capabilities make your documentation leaner and ideas more visual, which benefits the whole agile team.
https://blog.gurock.com/agile-mind-map/

Be it test planning in an agile team which needs entire team’s insights and collaboration, or categorization of product features, test areas and backlog, Mindmaps can be used for all aspects and phases of the project.

Testers can generate their test ideas and have them categorized in a mind map around the central theme of the feature. The visual nature of a mind map helps them find more scenarios, see which parts are more heavily tested, and focus on main areas or branches. Once done, they can have other stakeholders take a look at it and get their opinions. This fosters brainstorming together and gathers the maximum number of ideas from the entire team.

Find useful tips to create your own mindmaps, as well as some samples for your reference in agile test designing as well as test planning. Read the complete article here ->
https://blog.gurock.com/agile-mind-map/

Share your thoughts!

My interview with Thomas Cagley featured on SPaMCAST

I recently had a chance to chat with Mr. Thomas Cagley in an interview for his wonderful Podcast channel SPaMCAST. We talked all about Agile Testing, its differences from the traditional approach of testing, Agile Pods and the upcoming trends in the testing world!

It was a wonderful experience and I am grateful for having the chance to talk to one of the people I so look up to in the industry. Here is the link to the podcast show notes and info

http://spamcast.libsyn.com/spamcast-516-agile-testing-and-more-an-interview-with-nishi-grover-garg

Here is the link for Direct Playback: bit.ly/2QKvPvm

 

Hear it out and do share your thoughts!

Cheers

Nishi

 

How To Convince Your Boss to adopt a Test Management Tool

Tips to Convince your Manager to Adopt a Test Management Tool

Working as a tester in today’s fast paced software delivery can be taxing. The advent of agile and DevOps has brought with it the need for faster and continuous testing, hence leaving no time for test content and management tasks. If you are a tester today then you may know what I mean and may already be bearing the brunt of manually creating, mapping, managing and tracking things like test documents, release versions, defects and their history, run reports and results and system health status at all times. You are craving for a solution and you know that will be a proper test management system. But you know the feeling when you are sure about something but your boss doesn’t seem to notice or care?

This happens often with test management tools, mainly because they are a part of process improvement and bosses may not care about ‘how’ the job is getting done as long as it is getting done! Most of the times your manager may not be aware of the features of the tool, the benefits it brings and its impact on your performance.

I recently wrote about the same in my guest post for PractiTest! Here is the link to my article for PractiTest QA Learning Centre  where I discuss ways you can convince your manager to adopt a test management tool using reasons he/she won’t be able to ignore!

  • Consider the manager’s goals
    tool image
  • Think of their pain points
  • Get your co-workers on board
  • Organise a Case Study
  • Really know the tool you want
  • Highlight additional integrations, features and value of the  tool
  • Take a Friendly approach

 

To read the complete article Click Here–>

I do hope that these tips help you convince your boss to get you the shiny new tool you need to make your life easier, you tests more manageable and your work more fun!

Please comment on the article and share your experiences!

-Nishi

P.S.

Image source – https://kendis.io/tag/scaled-agile-framework-tool/

 

Using a Combination of Scripted, Automated and Exploratory Testing for Optimum QA Coverage

Most test teams today are struggling to find better ways to handle their testing. With the advent of Agile in our software development processes, teams are perennially under pressure to provide faster releases without lowering their standards of quality. This, in turn, adds load on the in-house test teams to ensure finding more and crucial issues and to prevent defect leakage. For this reason, testers look at strategies and practices that can help them achieve their goals and add more value to the product’s quality.

In my opinion as a hands-on agile tester, there is no single silver bullet to quality, but a combination of different types and approaches to testing that can help us get closer to our quality goals. Test teams need to strategize and plan the usage of a combination of scripted tests, automated tests as well as exploratory tests for achieving an optimum coverage and best quality software.

Here is my latest article for PractiTest QA Learning Centre where I discuss the need to have a combination of scripted, automated as well as exploratory tests for an optimum QA coverage–

https://www.practitest.com/qa-learningcenter/thank-you/exploratory-testing-optimum-qa-coverage/ 

Scripted Tests

When we look at the typical test approach, it begins with test scripting and designing tests as per software functionality. These are created using requirement analysis and test design techniques and also using common sense and skills by our skilled testers. These scripted tests form the starting point of testing a new feature, change or addition in the software.

Automated Testing

In addition to running the scripted tests manually, testers also rely on automated tests. These tests are scripted using various test automation tools and test automation, i.e. ability to write these automated test scripts is, thus, a much-wanted skill nowadays for all test professionals. The ability to run some tests using automated scripts helps repeatability and saves a lot of time and effort on part of the test teams. But most importantly, by automating the drudgery away, it saves the tester from repeated manual laborious tests and frees up their time for more creative thinking and exploration around the application.

Exploratory Testing

Exploration of software is basically looking at the feature/functionality/change and overall behavior from a learning as well as a critical standpoint. Exploratory Testing is a crucial aspect of software testing, which almost every tester performs knowingly or subconsciously.

Cem Kaner coined the term Exploratory Testing in his book “Testing Computer Software” and described it as:

“Simultaneous test design, test execution and learning with an emphasis on learning”

https://www.practitest.com/qa-learningcenter/thank-you/exploratory-testing-optimum-qa-coverage/ 

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