Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-3

“Cultural Challenges”

This chapter is dedicated to talking about organisational problems with agile adoption, mostly from a cultural point of view- how people perceive changes, how they work, giving up control and also taking charge. It is a very comprehensive description of many problems we see on a daily basis at our work and in teams struggling with agile transformation.

Points to remember and Quotable Quotes

  • Agile teams are best suites for organisations that allow independent thinking.
  • Fear is a powerful emotion, and if not addressed, it can jeopardize the transition into agile
  • Testers who don’t change their approach to testing have a hard time working closely with the rest of the development team
  • If the organisation culture is to push towards release without caring for quality, the teams will face an uphill battle in working in agile
  • Companies where testers assume the role of ‘Quality Police’ will also have a challenge since teams will not buy-into the idea of building quality in, as they are accustomed to badgering it in later.
  • If your organisation focuses on learning, it will encourage continuous process improvement and will likely adopt agile much more quickly.
  • Testers need time and training, like everyone else learning to work in agile
  • To help testers adjust, you may need to bring in an experienced agile testing coach to act as a mentor and a teacher.

Agile focuses on working at a sustainable pace, all the time. In contrast to the ‘fast and furious’ testing done at the end of release cycles in traditional projects (often amounting to overtime). In agile, if overtime is required, it is an exception, and that too for the whole team and not just the testers.

  • In agile, the relationship between the customer and the development team is more a partnership than a vendor-supplier relationship.
  • Even if an entire company adopts agile, some teams make the transition more successfully than others.

About Introducing Change-

“Expect and Accept Chaos as you implement Agile Processes.”

Find the areas of most pain, determine what practices will solve the problem so that you can get some immediate progress out of the chaos.

  • The critical success factor is whether the team takes ownership and has the ability to customise its approach
  • Celebrate success- Acknowledgement is important if you want a change to stick.
  • Rather than managing the team’s activities at a low level, managers of agile teams focus on removing obstacles so that team members can do their best work

“Agile development might seem fast-paced, but the change can seem glacial”

Beware of the Quality Police mentality— Be a collaborator, not an enforcer

The highlight of this chapter for me was reading the ‘Testers Bill of Rights’

I had not heard about this before , so reading this was pretty cool, and for sure fundamental to any tester’s life. Check it out-

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-2

“The Principles for agile testers”

Points to remember and Quotable Quotes

Definition of Agile Tester-

“A professional tester who embraces change, collaborates well with both technical and businesspeople, and understands the concept of using tests to document requirements and drive development.”

  • Skills are important, but attitude counts more
  • An agile tester does not see herself as a quality police officer, protecting her customers from inadequate code.
  • Agile testers don’t limit themselves to solving only testing issues.
  • Creativity, openness to ideas, willingness to take on any task or role, focus on the customer and a constant view of the big picture – are some components of the agile testing mindset.
  • A team that guides itself with agile values and principles will have higher team morale and better velocity than a poorly functioning team of talented individuals.
  • The principles important for agile testers are –
    • Provide continuous feedback
    • Deliver value to customer
    • Enable face-to-face communication
    • Have courage
    • Keep it Simple
    • Practice continuous improvement
    • Respond to change
    • Self-organize
    • Focus on people
    • Enjoy
  • AATD “Agile Attention Deficit Disorder” – Anything not learned quickly might be deemed useless!
  • Automating tests is hard, but it is much easier when you have the whole team working together.
  • Agile development rewards the agile tester’s passion for her work!

I had written an article about differences between Agile and Traditional testing approaches a few years back. Though I had not read this book at the time, I now feel how many of the points were similar and resonate the same even now. You can read my article here – https://testwithnishi.com/2016/10/20/5-ways-agile-testing-is-different-from-traditional-testing/

***Update **About face-to-face communication** during Covid-19 ***

As I am reading this book during this bizarre time of social-distancing, working remotely and entire nations on lockdown, the part about ‘face-to-face’ communication has a new meaning now. As Janet Gregory also pointed out in response to this article, our definition of face-to-face has changed over the last few weeks over the entire world! We are lucky to have technology that helps us continue effective communication within our teams, have conversations, video calls, screen shares, continue learning over webinars and continue working, feeling useful and being productive.

Hoping things change soon and we can go back to having fun, productive discussions with our team mates over coffee. Until then — Happy social distancing!

*************

Blind Spots in Software Testing

Reduced awareness or unintended ignorance of certain aspects can lead to inattentional blindness, or the failure to notice something that should have been visible because our attention was engaged elsewhere. As a human psychological concept, inattentional blindness also plagues testers and their mindset when testing. In my latest article for Testrail blog, I look at some steps we can take to overcome this challenge and avoid blind spots in our testing work.

Target Fixation

It is a natural response of our brain to avoid getting overloaded with information. It automatically focuses on information that is most important while avoiding unnecessary details and noise.

In many situations, this manifests in our focus on the task at hand and its context so much that we neglect surrounding details. This is true for day-to-day activities like bumping into a pillar while looking at our phones, failing to see a swerving car when watching the road ahead… or not noticing a takeaway coffee cup in the middle of a popular television show set in ancient times!

Let’s say you are browsing through a website with the intention of looking at the layouts that must match provided mockups. While you are doing that, you may miss the following:

  • The homepage of the website has an older logo of the company that should have been replaced by the newer version.
  • The login box has username and password fields but the login button is missing.
  • The URL structure of the website is all wonky and the individual page URLs are not named correctly.

Overlooked Information

Testers often execute tests that have defined steps and expected results, so we frequently overlook anything that is not defined and only check for the results we’re looking for. The tester’s mind is attuned to looking for specified errors, while other information or defects may tend to get missed, even though they may be right in front of our eyes.
Pick up any passed test case and try to re-execute it, but this time keep an open eye and an open mind for any new information surrounding the test. More often than not, you will find that many more defects, risk areas or questions can be found in the same area, despite the test having passed.

Read More—>

Read complete article at https://blog.gurock.com/blind-spots-software-testing/

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ Chapter-1

“What is Agile Testing, Anyway?”

Points to remember and Quotable Quotes:

  • “Several core practices used by agile teams relate to testing.”
    • Programmers using TDD, code integration tests being written contribute to a successful project.
  • “Agile Testing just doesn’t mean testing on an agile project.”
    • Some testing approaches like exploratory testing are inherently agile, whether done in an agile project or not.
  • Testers are integral members of the customer team as well as development team
  • The best part of this chapter is Lisa and Janet’s wonderful stories on beginning with their first agile projects, and a realization by Janet’s co-worker, a developer in a team following XP on how they saw Janet’s contribution to the project.
  • “Testers don’t sit & wait for work; they get up and look for ways to contribute throughout the development cycle and beyond.”
  • Traditional vs Agile Testing
    • In Traditional approach – “Testing gets “squished” because coding takes longer than expected, and because teams get into a code-and-fix cycle at the end.
    • In Agile – “As an agile team member, you will need to be adaptive to the team’s needs
    • “Participants, tests, and tools need to be adaptive.”
  • “An Agile team is a wonderful place to be a tester”
  • The Whole-Team Approach –
    • “Everyone on an agile team gets “test-infected.”
    • “An agile team must possess all the skills needed to produce quality code that delivers the features required by the organization.”
    • “The whole team approach involves constant collaboration”
    • “On an agile team, anyone can ask for and receive help”
  • “The fact is, it’s all about quality – and if it’s not, we question whether it’s really an ‘agile’ team.”

Wanna Read along? Get your copy of the book at

https://www.flipkart.com/agile-testing/p/itmdytt85fzashud?pid=9788131730683

OR find a paperback or ebook version!

Read Along- ‘Agile Testing’ by Lisa Crispin & Janet Gregory

Book Read Blogs Series

I used to love books, reading was a fun and satisfying hobby for the introverted teen I was. But lately I may have gotten away from it for known and unknown reasons. I want to pursue the passion again and hold myself accountable too. So, this year I am starting a ‘Read Along’ series on my blog.

“Agile Testing” by Lisa Crispin & Janet Gregory

I will begin by reading the book I had bought last year. “Agile Testing” by Lisa & Janet is a coveted read for all agile enthusiasts & testers and is also featured in the best books for testers at https://continuoustesting.blog/2020/01/17/most-recommended-software-testing-books-to-read-in-2020-and-beyond/

I have learnt agile testing by doing it, learning it hands-on, training & running courses on agile testing for professionals. I wanted to enhance my knowledge by reading the professional work by these awesome ladies.

So, I will be reading the book and will post about learnings, things to remember & quotable quotes from each chapter as I progress. This is to hold myself accountable, as well as to help people looking for good reads or learnings. Hope this helps you. Have you read this book? Do share your thoughts & learnings too!

Here are links to the posts for this book-

Chapter-1

How to become a self-taught Tester in 2020

Learning is an ongoing process, and hopefully a lifelong one. Being a professional in any field requires you to constantly update your knowledge and continue to learn.

Software testing is a very in-demand role, so many people aspire to get into this line of work — but they may not know where to begin.

If you are fresh out of college or looking to switch careers, even if you are not from a computing or engineering background at all, you can jump-start your career in testing. In my article published at TestRail blog, I have given some tips and advice on how to become a self-taught software tester this year.

Read

Books provide a world of knowledge, and despite shifting trends, books can never be outdated, as older ideas can give you a foundation for new information. Reading a book allows you to delve deeper into a topic of your choice at your own pace.

  • Begin by searching for books on software testing, quality assurance practices, and industry leaders.
  • Then seek books that can help you start applying the knowledge.
  • If picking up a physical book is not your cup of tea, read online — there are many great portals with awesome content, articles, and ideas.

Diversify Your Knowledge

Software testing is not a singular skill; it requires a number of skills, both technical and non-technical. When beginning your quest to learn about software testing, delve into various areas of the domain and look for what interests you the most.

Read More »

The Art of Bug Advocacy

Testers find defects and raise awareness about quality. What happens after the bugs are found can be any tester’s guess, though. Bugs may get delayed, postponed, go unnoticed or linger on due to lack of information.

In my article for Ranorex blog, I talk about how Testers need to champion the cause of their bugs in order to avoid unneeded delays in fixing defects that are important. At the same time, testers should maintain a distance to make it an impersonal and impartial experience. Testers need to master the art of bug advocacy!

Why is advocacy important?

Advocacy is basically pleading the case for a bug to be fixed. The testers who find the bugs are the ones who need to advocate for their bugs. It is important that they take a stand and voice their opinions.

Some bugs may not be deemed important from a business perspective, as they seem too small. But in reality, they may be blocking an important feature for a particular user group. On the other hand, some bugs may seem more critical than they truly are, and while fixing them may be important, it may not be the highest of priority.

Whatever the case, testers must aim to present the facts and data in such a way that decision-makers are able to make well-informed resolutions about the issue.

Communication is key

Advocating for anything is not a one-way street. It takes discussion, debate and reaching a consensus on key points to make a collective decision. This is where testers’ communication skill plays a key role. Testers need to have good communication, both verbal and written.

Read More »